Discover the power and the story of
Authentic Baltimore ...
Begins on an Iron Plantation
Learn More
Discover the power and the story of
Authentic Baltimore ...
Begins on an Iron Plantation
Learn More
Discover the power and the story of
Authentic Baltimore
Begins on an Iron Plantation
Learn More

Lives were its engine ...

Imagine a working 1770s plantation with enslaved and indentured labor, Native Americans, free farmers, and gentry — in what is now Southwest Baltimore’s Pigtown. This was Carroll’s Hundred, a mere ten-minute walk from today’s Inner Harbor. Our mission is to separate its authentic history from colonial myth to reveal Baltimore’s true origins as a mercantile economy — one founded on iron, slavery, and unpaid labor. Carroll’s Hundred is ground zero for anyone wanting to better understand the diverse, post-industrial city we live in today.

Because so much has been written about the land-owning Carroll family that owned the plantation, our story focuses on the forgotten pioneers that worked it — the African enslaved people, European indentured workers, and Native Americans.  Charles and Margaret Carroll could not have survived and prospered without the vital support of the Harden, Lynch, Hall, Coney, and other enslaved families, who we have learned about through archaeological and geneaological research.

The Carrolls and this diverse labor force were culturally and economically interdependent.  This was not New England, nor the Southern Low Country, but the Upper Chesapeake.  Carroll’s Hundred and its iron foundry were at the center of one of the greatest technological experiments in human history — the mass production of goods —  giving rise to the English industrial revolution of the nineteenth century.

It took place here!  The pioneers of Carroll’s Hundred-on-Patapsco forged the enterprise that became “The Port That Built a City”.  It’s past time we understood and celebrated their achievement!

How We Search for Authentic History:
education, research, and advocacy.

Education

Teachers & Families

Research

Archaeology & Artifacts

Advocacy

The Otobo Project

Donate

Historical Sites like Carroll’s Hundred are extremely rare.  In fact, this is the only remaining plantation site in any American city.  Its diverse racial fabric is evidence of America’s essential multi-cultural identity.  The project to save Carroll’s Hundred has always been about saving this authentic American history.  Now, more than ever, Baltimore’s unique #BlackLivesMatter story must be given its prominent and accurate place in the history of our nation’s founding. 

The Carroll’s Hundred website is also part of our larger public education and information advocacy campaign to revive the living heart of this and other Baltimore neighborhoods.

For more, see The Otobo Project.

Stay Informed

Sign up to receive news and updates from Carroll’s Hundred.  Keep up to date with our blogs, and follow us on Facebook!

Fill out my online form.

Blogs and Recent News

Carroll’s Hundred

A Brief Historical Saga — For twenty-five years, the Carroll Park Foundation focused, laser-like, on educating the public and protecting the historical record of one …

Read More →

The Otobo Project

Our first blog post focuses on a largely forgotten but highly significant African American burial ground known as Laurel Cemetery in Northeast Baltimore. This landmark …

Read More →

Baltimore Beats

Recently, as Carroll’s Hundred was gearing up to launch its new website, in a curious twist of synchronicity, the New York Times Magazine announced a …

Read More →